Brussel Sprouts

Brussel Sprouts

As a member of the cruciferous vegetable family, Brussels sprouts contain significant amounts of antioxidants, vitamin C and beta-carotene (vitamin A), and nitrogen compounds, which may reduce the risk of certain cancers.

Nutrition Facts -  Brussel Sprouts

Nutrition Facts - Brussel Sprouts

Brussels sprouts, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt More information: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2363/2

How to Cook Brussel Sprouts

How to Cook Brussel Sprouts

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Seeds should be planted ~18 to 24 inches apart. They require a minimum of 6 hours of sunlight daily with 1 to 1 1/2 inches of water weekly. The soil pH should be ~6.8. Brussels sprouts are ready to harvest when the tiny heads are firm, green, and 1 to 2 inches in diameter. Remove sprouts by twisting them until they break away from the plant. As you remove the lower sprouts, you can also remove yellowing leaves; the plant continues to grow upward, producing more leaves and sprouts.

Roasted Brussel Sprouts with Garlic

Roasted Brussel Sprouts with Garlic

Recipe link: http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1890-roasted-brussels-sprouts-with-garlic

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